Configure Windows to support UTC clock

If you configured your computer to dual boot between Windows and Linux and you don’t live under the GMT time zone, you may have noticed that the time under Linux is always off and if you attempt to correct it, it will be off under Windows. The problem is that Windows expects the BIOS time to be set directly to your local time while Linux expects it to be set to UTC and correct it for your time zone on run time (be sure that Linux has the correct time zone). To fix this problem you have to configure Windows to support UTC clock.

UTC is the French (become worldwide popular) abbreviation of “Coordinated Universal Time” and it is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time and it is the most popular successors to the Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Like to GMT, to calculate your local time you need to take the UTC time and add your time zone difference and eventually the daylight saving time difference if your nation follow it and it is summertime.

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Enable Google Chrome hardware acceleration

We have seen how to enable Mozilla Firefox hardware acceleration on Linux and this time we will see how to enable Google Chrome hardware acceleration; this guide will work on any major Operative System since the steps indicated are fully contained within Google Chrome’s settings.

Hardware acceleration is the use of specific computer hardware, like the graphic card for graphic related tasks, to perform some functions faster than is possible in “software-mode” running on the more general-purpose CPU. In order to benefit from hardware acceleration, the application must be programmed to support it and such support must be enabled at runtime (when the application is run by the user); the major browsers, like Mozilla Firefox and in this case Google Chrome, are programmed to support hardware acceleration, but not always they are enabled to use it.

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